Belgian Malinois Dog breed :Details of Belgian MalinoisDog:Information:Images:News Belgian Malinois

Belgian Malinois Dog breed :Details of Belgian MalinoisDog:Information:Images:News Belgian Malinois

The Belgian Malinois was named after the Belgian city of Malines. While the Belgian Malinois is still rare in the USA, it is popular in Belgium, its country of origin. It is one of the four varieties of Belgian sheepdogs, the Belgian Malinois, Belgian Tervuren, Belgian Groenendael, and the less popular Belgian Laekenois, which all share a common foundation. In most countries and breed clubs all four dogs are considered the same breed with different varieties in coat types. All four dogs share a breed standard in all countries except for the AKC, which since 1959 recognizes them as separate breeds and does not recognize one of the four (the Laekenois), whereas the UKC, which is also a U.S. registry does recognize all four varieties as one breed. Versatile and highly intelligent, all four varieties of the Belgian sheepdog excel at a variety of talents, including but not limited to, police work such as, narcotics and bomb detection, protection and Schutzhund, search and rescue, also obedience, agility, tracking, herding, sled and cart pulling and as a guide for the blind and assistant to the disabled. These high energy, extremely intelligent dogs need leadership, to be challenged, and well exercised daily and therefore are not for everyone, but can make an excellent family companion with the right owners. The Belgian Malinois was the first of the four sheepdogs to establish type. Until the other four were established in type they were called “Berger Belge a poil court autre que Malinois,” which means “Belgian short-coated Sheepdog who is not the Malinois.” Today all four sheepdogs are popular in Belgium, with the Laekenois and Malinois more often used as working type dogs, than the Belgian Groenendael and Tervuren but all types still making excellent workers.
The Belgian Malinois has a body that is often described as square, as that is the shape it appears to have when the legs and topline are viewed from the side. The chest is deep. The topline is level, sloping slightly at the withers. The overall size of the head is in proportion to the body. The skull is flat with the width and length being of the same distance. The muzzle is somewhat pointed and equal in length to the top of the skull with a moderate stop. The nose is black and so are the tight lips. The teeth meet in a scissors or level bite. The medium sized, almond-shaped eyes are brown. The erect ears are triangular in shape. The tail is strong at the base with the bone reaching to the hock. The feet are cat-like in shape. Dewclaws may be removed. The weather resistant, double-coat is short and straight. The coat color comes in rich fawn to red to mahogany to black, with black tips on the hairs. The mask and ears are black. Underneath the body, the tail and back end are a lighter fawn. The hair around the neck looks like a collar, as it is slightly longer.The Belgian Malinois will do okay in an apartment if it is sufficiently exercised. It is moderately active indoors and will do best with at least an average-sized yard. This breed prefers cool climates, but adapts well to others. It can live outdoors but would much rather be with his people.This is a working dog that is accustomed to an active outdoor life. As such it needs a lot of exercise, including a long daily walk. In addition, it will greatly benefit being off the leash as much as possible in a safe area.
Height: Males 24 – 26 inches (61 – 66 cm) Females 22 – 24 inches (56 – 61 cm)
Weight: 55 – 65 pounds (24 – 29 kg)
Life Expectancy is about 12-14 years

Crate Training

Crate Training

Crate Training